ARTIST INFORMATION
COLLECTORS' STOCKROOM

George Woods (1898-1963)
George Woods was a New Zealand draughtsman, illustrator, and artist. His works show the influence of Maori culture and the Pacific Islands; he had a reputation as an excellent colourist.
Woods undertook night study at the Wellington Technical College (forerunner to the Wellington Polytechnic) under Harry Linley Richardson, and Frederick Vincent Ellis in 1936.
As a modernist, Woods is best known for his graphic, stylised images and is most readily contextualised alongside contemporaries Russell Clark (1905-1966) and E. Mervyn Taylor (1906-1964). His early work, particularly illustration of books, is associated with the New Zealand Nationalist art movement, with his work set firmly in a native environment. He recognised nature as the bottom line for artists, commenting: "I think artists should begin where nature leaves off” His colour linocuts exhibited a strong linear image, and his skills as a draughtsman allowed him to develop a sculptural element to his work. Woods frequently employed the technique of simplifying his subject matter by accentuating physical characteristics and omitting others entirely. He had an ability to capture form and light through simple line forms and use of unbroken colour.
Woods was also included in the New Zealand Society of Artists Exhibition of Works by Contemporary New Zealand Artists, 1939.
Woods was intensely interested in Maori culture and had a keen appreciation of Polynesian art and sculpture, borne out of his travels in the region after finishing studies at the Wellington Technical College. Both Woods and his contemporary E. Mervyn Taylor, reinterpreted Maori mythology from a New Zealand European perspective at a time when attitudes of white New Zealanders to Maori were changing.
Woods and Taylor were the country’s most prominent book illustrators in the early 20th century. Many of the prints they created as illustrations for books were included in their solo and group exhibitions. The scraper-board print Battle of the Wind and the Sea Gods (1945), won Woods the Esther Glen Award from the New Zealand Library Association for outstanding contribution to children's literature.

Josua Toganvalu
Josua Toganivalu is a self-taught artist who lives a double career as a visual paint artist and as a computer graphic designer. He has been a member of the Red Wave Collective based at the Oceania Centre for Arts and Culture at the University of the South Pacific since the first painting workshop conducted by Niuean artist John Pule in March 1998. Josua has participated in all the Red Wave exhibitions held at the Oceania Centre. In September 2000, Josua was part of the Red Wave Group Exhibition at the James Harvey Gallery in Balmain, Sydney, Australia. In December was part of a displaying exhibition at the East West Centre, Honolulu, Hawaii. Apart from the exhibitions at the Centre he also participates at the annual National Art exhibitions organized by the Fiji Arts Council and was part of the 3rd Melanesian Arts Festival held in Suva in 2006. Toganivalu was again selected in June 2010 to be part of the visual arts team, representing Fiji at the Melanesian Arts Festival held in Noumea, New Caledonia. Some of Toganivalu's paintings are part of the Oceania Centre collection. Most of Toganivalu's paintings depict the earth colors as seen on masi and tapa - burnt sienna, umber and charcoal.

Basil Honour (1897-1988)
Born in Wellington in 1897, Honour studied under T. A. McCormack and exhibited regularly at the New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts during the 1920s and 1930s. His work is mainly of landscapes painted in oils. He later explored abstract painting. He died in 1988.

Emily Jackson (1909-1993)
Born in New Zealand in 1909, Emily Jackson did not become a painter until the 1970s. When Jackson moved with her family to Auckland in 1958 she saw a Toss Woollaston exhibition at the City Art Gallery and was profoundly impressed. His influence remained - the rawness, the colossal scale and the frantic brushwork. The persistent encouragement and inspiration of Colin McCahon, together with her own hard work, resulted in the development of Jackson's own unique style. Drawing her inspiration from the New Zealand landscape, she paints "tough" turbulent landscapes, bold and expressive - a tangle of colours and dirty brushwork. In 1966 Jackson became a working member of the Auckland Society of Arts winning the Bledisloe Medal for Landscape Painting in 1968. In 1981 she was the winner of the Ida Eise prize at the Auckland Society of Arts. She died in 1993.

Charlotte Graham (b. 1972)
Graham was born in 1972. She completed a Bachelor of Maori Visual Arts Degree in 2001, Post Graduate Diploma of Teaching in 2002 and is currently completing a Masters in Maori Visual Arts. She lives in Auckland.Charlotte Graham is of Waikato descent (Ngati Mahuta, Ngai Tai). Graham is one of a new generation of Maori artists who draw on their tribal heritage in order to explore critical issues that affect New Zealand society such as racism, cultural stereotyping and land rights.

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE

Artwork title, 2010. Oil on canvas. 121.5 x 107 cm

AVAILABLE